A Grammar Book For You And I Oops Me Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

A Grammar Book for You and I-- Oops, Me!

A Grammar Book for You and I-- Oops, Me!

Author: C. Edward Good
Publisher: Capital Books
ISBN: 1892123231
Pages: 430
Year: 2002
Correct English usage as it's never been taught before: lucidly, memorably, and humorously -- for all ages.
A Grammar Book for You and I-- Oops, Me!

A Grammar Book for You and I-- Oops, Me!

Author: C. Edward Good
Publisher: Capital Books
ISBN: 1892123231
Pages: 430
Year: 2002
Correct English usage as it's never been taught before: lucidly, memorably, and humorously -- for all ages.
A Grammar Book for You and I-- Oops, Me!

A Grammar Book for You and I-- Oops, Me!

Author: C. Edward Good
Publisher:
ISBN: 0739425250
Pages: 430
Year: 2002

Who's (... oops!) whose grammar book is this anyway?

Who's (... oops!) whose grammar book is this anyway?

Author: C. Edward Good
Publisher:
ISBN: 1567315763
Pages: 430
Year: 2002

The Vocabulary of Success

The Vocabulary of Success

Author: C. Edward Good
Publisher: Capital Books Incorporated
ISBN: 1933102667
Pages: 259
Year: 2008
Certain words give vocabulary added panache, compelling others to pay attention. Good captures these words in this ideal resource for students facing entrance exams and professional people looking to advance their careers.
The Dragon Grammar Book

The Dragon Grammar Book

Author: Diane Mae Robinson
Publisher:
ISBN: 1988714044
Pages: 140
Year: 2017-12-10
Finally! An easy-to-understand grammar book with fun grammar lessons. From multi-award winning children's author, Diane Mae Robinson, The Dragon Grammar Book introduces middle grades and up to the basic rules of the English language with easy grammar lessons and a witty writing style. "Robinson has produced a winner."-Literary Titan
Missed Periods and Other Grammar Scares

Missed Periods and Other Grammar Scares

Author: Jenny Baranick
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.
ISBN: 1616083700
Pages: 167
Year: 2012
Provides jargon-free coverage of today's most common and noticeable errors and usages, from the correct placements of apostrophes and proper capitalizations to the difference between an ellipsis and em dash.
Common Errors in English Usage, Paul Brians, 2008

Common Errors in English Usage, Paul Brians, 2008

Author: Paul Brians
Publisher: Bukupedia
ISBN:
Pages: 257
Year: 2008-07-15
What is an error in English? The concept of language errors is a fuzzy one. I'll leave to linguists the technical definitions. Here we're concerned only with deviations from the standard use of English as judged by sophisticated users such as professional writers, editors, teachers, and literate executives and personnel officers. The aim of this site is to help you avoid low grades, lost employment opportunities, lost business, and titters of amusement at the way you write or speak. But isn't one person's mistake another's standard usage? Often enough, but if your standard usage causes other people to consider you stupid or ignorant, you may want to consider changing it. You have the right to express yourself in any manner you please, but if you wish to communicate effectively you should use nonstandard English only when you intend to, rather than fall into it because you don't know any better. I'm learning English as a second language. Will this site help me improve my English? Very likely, though it's really aimed at the most common errors of native speakers. The errors others make in English differ according to the characteristics of their first languages. Speakers of other languages tend to make some specific errors that are uncommon among native speakers, so you may also want to consult sites dealing specifically with English as a second language (see http://www.cln.org/subjects/esl_cur.html and http://esl.about.com/education/adulted/esl/). There is also a Help Desk for ESL students at Washington State University at http://www.wsu.edu/~gordonl/ESL/. An outstanding book you may want to order is Ann Raimes' Keys for Writers. This is not a questionandanswer site for ESL. Aren't some of these points awfully picky? This is a relative matter. One person's gaffe is another's peccadillo. Some common complaints about usage strike me as too persnickety, but I'm just covering mistakes in English that happen to bother me. Feel free to create your own page listing your own pet peeves, but I welcome suggestions for additions to these pages.
Mightier than the sword

Mightier than the sword

Author: C. Edward Good
Publisher: Prima Lifestyles
ISBN:
Pages: 247
Year: 1989

Painless Grammar

Painless Grammar

Author: Rebecca Elliott
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1438068255
Pages: 296
Year: 2016-04-19
Combines instruction in sentence structure with examination of amusing expressions, and gives tips on email communication, editing a school paper, and more. Titles in Barron’s extensive Painless Series cover a wide range of subjects, as they are taught at middle school and high school levels. Perfect for supporting Common Core Standards, these books are written for students who find the subjects somewhat confusing, or just need a little extra help. Most of these books take a lighthearted, humorous approach to their subjects, and offer fun exercises including puzzles, games, and challenging “Brain Tickler” problems to solve. Bonus Online Component: includes additional games to challenge students, including Beat the Clock, a line match game, and a word scramble.
The Handbook of Good English

The Handbook of Good English

Author: Edward D. Johnson
Publisher:
ISBN: 0816027110
Pages: 427
Year: 1991
A comprehensive, convenient guide to modern grammar, punctuation, usage, and style, with Johnson's lucid examples and explanations. A welcome feature is the combined glossary/index, alphabetically arranged to give instant answers to the most commonly asked questions about misused words, phrases, and
Yes, I Could Care Less

Yes, I Could Care Less

Author: Bill Walsh
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin
ISBN: 1250032016
Pages: 304
Year: 2013-06-18
These are interesting times for word nerds. We ate, shot and left, bonding over a joke about a panda and some rants about greengrocers who abuse apostrophes. We can go on Facebook and vow to judge people when they use poor grammar. The fiftieth anniversary of the publication of The Elements of Style inspired sentimental reveries. Grammar Girl's tally of Twitter followers is well into six digits. We can't get enough of a parody of the Associated Press Stylebook, of all things, or a collection of "unnecessary" quotation marks. Could you care less? Does bad grammar or usage "literally" make your head explode? Test your need for this new book with these sentences: "Katrina misplaced many residents of New Orleans from their homes." "Sherry finally graduated college this year." "An armed gunman held up a convenience store on Broadway yesterday afternoon." Pat yourself on the back if you found issues in every one of these sentences, but remember: There is a world out there beyond the stylebooks, beyond Strunk and White, beyond Lynne Truss and Failblogs. In his long-awaited follow-up to Lapsing Into a Comma and The Elephants of Style, while steering readers and writers on the proper road to correct usage, Walsh cautions against slavish adherence to rules, emphasizing that the correct choice often depends on the situation. He might disagree with the AP Stylebook or Merriam-Webster, but he always backs up his preferences with logic and humor. Walsh argues with both sides in the language wars, the sticklers and the apologists, and even with himself, over the disputed territory and ultimately over whether all this is warfare or just a big misunderstanding. Part usage manual, part confessional, and part manifesto, Yes, I Could Care Less bounces from sadomasochism to weather geekery, from "Top Chef" to Monty Python, from the chile of New Mexico to the daiquiris of Las Vegas, with Walsh's distinctive take on the way we write and talk. Yes, I Could Care Less is a lively and often personal look at one man's continuing journey through the obstacle course that some refer to, far too simply, as "grammar."
100 Ways to Improve Your Writing

100 Ways to Improve Your Writing

Author: Gary Provost
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1440672660
Pages: 176
Year: 1985-10-01
This is the one guide that anyone who writes--whether student, business person, or professional writer--should put on the desk beside pencil, pen, typewriter, or word processor. Filled with professional tips and a wealth of instructive examples, this valuable, easy-to-use handbook can help you solve any and all writing problems.
Woe Is I

Woe Is I

Author: Patricia T. O'Conner
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101458054
Pages: 288
Year: 2010-07-27
In this new edition of Woe Is I, Patricia T. O’Conner unties the knottiest grammar tangles and displays the same lively humor that has charmed and enlightened grateful readers for years. With new chapters on spelling and punctuation, and fresh insights into the rights, wrongs, and maybes of English grammar and usage, Woe Is I offers down-to-earth explanations and plain-English solutions to the language mysteries that bedevil all of us: • Avoid the persistent (and persistently embarrassing) grammatical errors that bewilder the best andthe brightest • Pronounce and spell words that even the smartest people mangle • Correctly use hundreds of woefully abused words and phrases From the Trade Paperback edition.
Literally, the Best Language Book Ever

Literally, the Best Language Book Ever

Author: Paul Yeager
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101221070
Pages: 208
Year: 2008-05-06
By turns gleefully precise and happily contrarian, this is a highly opinionated guide to better communication. In Literally, the Best Language Book Ever, author Paul Yeager attacks with a linguistic scalpel the illogical expressions and misappropriated meanings that are so commonplace and annoying. Identifying hundreds of common language miscues, Yeager provides an astute look at the world of words and how we abuse them every day. For the grammar snobs looking for any port in a storm of subpar syntax, or the self-confessed rubes seeking a helping hand, this witty guide can transform even the least literate into the epitome of eloquence.