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Birds of the Midwest

Birds of the Midwest

Author: Stan Tekiela
Publisher: Adventure Publications
ISBN: 1591934060
Pages: 22
Year: 2013-02-20
"Organized by color for quick and easy identification, this guide covers 113 species of the most comon birds found in the Midwest."--Page 2 of cover.
Endangered and Disappearing Birds of the Midwest

Endangered and Disappearing Birds of the Midwest

Author: Matt Williams
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253035317
Pages: 256
Year: 2018-08
From the birds who wake us in the morning with their cheerful chorus to those who flock to our feeders and brighten a gloomy winter day, birds fascinate us with their lively and interesting behavior and provide essential services from controlling pest populations to pollinating crops. And yet for all the benefits they provide, many species across Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio are in danger of extinction due to loss of habitat, agricultural expansion, changing forest conditions, and interactions with humans. In Endangered and Disappearing Birds of the Midwest, Matt Williams profiles forty of the most beautiful and interesting birds who winter, breed, or migrate through the Midwest and whose populations are most in danger of disappearing from the region. Each profile includes the current endangered status of the species, a description of the bird's vocal and nesting patterns, and tips to help readers identify them, along with stunning color images and detailed migration maps. An exquisite and timely examination of our feathered friends, Endangered and Disappearing Birds of the Midwest is a call to action to protect these vulnerable and gorgeous creatures that enliven our world.
Field Guide to Backyard Birds of the Midwest

Field Guide to Backyard Birds of the Midwest

Author: Cool Springs Press
Publisher: Cool Springs Press
ISBN: 1591860075
Pages: 90
Year: 2008-09-01
From the expert editors at Cool Springs Press, a series of regional bird books that love the outdoors as much as you do. “Patience is a virtue,” said no backyard bird ever. That’s why, when these busy creatures come flitting into view, you need to have your resources ready at a moment’s notice. Have you spent all this time mistaking temporarily intoxicated Cedar Waxwings for injured ones? A forgivable error, but with the Field Guide to Backyard Birds of the Midwest, you’ll be duly crediting those fermented wild berries in no time. Each book in this series has been conveniently packaged in a field-sized 5”x8” format: large enough to showcase the gorgeous close-up photography within, but small enough to keep dependably at the ready. In this edition, each of the Midwest region’s 80 most popular bird species gets its own page, complete with a concise description, preferred habitat, feeding and migration habits, and tips for attracting them to your bird feeders. Illustrated with colorful range maps, vibrant images, and a brilliant tabbed layout that helps you quickly search for birds by color, this portable field book will never again leave that elusive Pileated Woodpecker unimpressed with your sub-par suet supply. Midwestern states include Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Ohio, and Nebraska. Look for our other four Field Guide to Backyard Birds titles, covering the Mid-Atlantic, South, Northeast, and West regions of the United States.
Fifty Common Birds of the Upper Midwest

Fifty Common Birds of the Upper Midwest

Author: Nancy Overcott
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1587296640
Pages: 124
Year: 2007-09-01
No bird is common, if we use “common” to mean ordinary. But birds that are seen more commonly than others can seem less noteworthy than species that are rarely glimpsed. In this gathering of essays and illustrations celebrating fifty of the most common birds of the Upper Midwest, illustrator Dana Gardner and writer Nancy Overcott encourage us to take a closer look at these familiar birds with renewed appreciation for their not-so-ordinary beauty and lifeways. Beginning with the garishly colored male and the more gently colored female wood duck, whose tree cavity nest serves as a launching pad for ducklings in the summer months, and ending on a bright yellow note with the American goldfinch, whose cheerful presence enlivens the midwestern landscape all year long, Overcott combines field observations drawn from her twenty-plus years of living and birding in Minnesota's Big Woods with anecdotes and data from other ornithologists to portray each species' life cycle, its vocalizations and appearance, and its habitat, food, and foraging methods as well as migration patterns and distribution. Infused with a dedication to conserving natural resources, her succinct yet personable prose forms an ideal complement to Gardner's watercolors as this renowned illustrator of avian life worldwide revisits the birds of his childhood. Together art and text ensure that the wild turkey, great blue heron, sharp-shinned hawk, barred owl, pileated woodpecker, house wren, ovenbird, field sparrow, rose-breasted grosbeak, red-winged blackbird, and forty other species of the Upper Midwest are never seen as common again.
Birds of the Midwest

Birds of the Midwest

Author: Roger Tory Peterson
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0395867339
Pages: 12
Year: 1997
Peterson FlashGuides are the most compact and convenient field guides ever made: slim as road maps and ideal for hikers, bikers, canoeists, or anyone who wants to travel light.
Feeder Birds of the Midwest

Feeder Birds of the Midwest

Author: The Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Publisher: Cornell All about Birds
ISBN: 1620052210
Pages: 12
Year: 2017-05-16
For bird enthusiasts, offering food at feeders is a way to enjoy a close-up view of target species while helping them survive and thrive. This guide profiles 40 common feeder birds found in the Midwest United States, along with feeder types and recommended foods for attracting each species. Also included are comments about each species' habitat and behaviors.
Sibley's Backyard Birds of the Upper Midwest

Sibley's Backyard Birds of the Upper Midwest

Author: David Allen Sibley
Publisher: Steven m Lewers & Assoc
ISBN: 1935380648
Pages: 12
Year: 2011-01-01
Written and illustrated by David Allen Sibley, America's most widely respected bird illustrator and ornithologist, this FoldingGuide offers instant access to just what backyard birdwatchers need to know. 69 land bird species are covered, including multiple illustrations, descriptive captions, size, range, and seasonal presence. The Upper Midwest region includes MIchigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota, Iowa, North and South Dakota.
Taking Flight

Taking Flight

Author: Michael Edmonds
Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
ISBN: 0870208373
Pages: 304
Year: 2018-03-09
A dynamic account of ornithological history in America’s heartland. Today, more than fifty million Americans traipse through wetlands at dawn, endure clouds of mosquitoes, and brave freezing autumn winds just to catch a glimpse of a bird. The human desire to connect with winged creatures defies age and generation. In the Midwest, humans and birds have lived together for more than twelve thousand years. Taking Flight explores how and why people have worshipped, feared, studied, hunted, eaten, and protected the birds that surrounded them. Author and birder Michael Edmonds has combed archaeological reports, missionaries’ journals, travelers’ letters, early scientific treatises, the memoirs of American Indian elders, and the folklore of hunters, farmers, and formerly enslaved people throughout the Midwest to reveal how our ancestors thought about the very same birds we see today. Whether you’re a casual bird-watcher, a hard-core life-lister, or simply someone who loves the outdoors, you’ll look at birds differently after reading this book.
Birds of Prey of the Midwest Field Guide

Birds of Prey of the Midwest Field Guide

Author: Stan Tekiela
Publisher: Adventure Publications
ISBN: 1591932475
Pages: 188
Year: 2010-05-05
Identifying birds of prey is easier than ever! This field guide features Midwest birds of prey only - all of the hawks, eagles, falcons, kites, vultures and owls found in the Midwest. Organized for efficient use, the book offers fact-filled information that's accessible for beginners but informative for more experienced birders. Stunning photos, naturalist information, interesting gee-whiz facts and a Quick-Compare section help to make watching raptors more enjoyable, informative and productive.
The Scientific Nomenclature of Birds in the Upper Midwest

The Scientific Nomenclature of Birds in the Upper Midwest

Author: James Sandrock, Jean C. Prior
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1609382250
Pages: 180
Year: 2014-03
The translation and explanation of genus and species names yield markers to help us identify birds in the field as well as remember distinctive traits. Having a basic understanding of the scientific and common names of birds reveals insights into their color, behavior, habitat, or geography. Knowing that Cyanocitta means “blue chatterer” and cristata means “crested, tufted” or that Anas means “a duck” and clypeata means “armed with a shield” tells you just about everything you need to identify a Blue Jay or a Northern Shoveler. In this portable reference book, James Sandrock and Jean Prior explain the science and history behind the names of some 450 birds of the Upper Midwest states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North and South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Since many of these birds occur throughout the United States, this handbook can also be used by birders in other parts of the country. The authors examine the roots, stems, and construction of scientific names from their classical Latin and Greek or other linguistic origins. The translations of these words and insights into their sources yield quirky, tantalizing facts about the people, geography, habitat, and mythology behind bird names. Each entry also includes the bird’s common name as well as local or regional names. Beginning birders confused by scientific names as well as more experienced birders curious about such names will find that the book opens unexpected connections into linguistic, historical, biological, artistic, biographical, and even aesthetic realms. Highlighting the obvious and not-so-obvious links between birds and language, this practical guide continues a long scholarly tradition of such books by and for those afoot in the field. Whether you are hiking with binoculars or watching a backyard bird feeder or reading at home, The Scientific Nomenclature of Birds in the Upper Midwest will greatly enhance your appreciation of birds.
Birds of Missouri

Birds of Missouri

Author: Stan Tekiela
Publisher: Adventurekeen
ISBN: 1885061358
Pages: 300
Year: 2001-11-01
See a yellow bird and donít know what it is? No problem! This remarkable field guide features 115 bird species (only Missouri birds!) organized by color. Full-page photos, detailed descriptions, Stanís Notes and range maps help to ensure correct I.D.
Birdscaping in the Midwest

Birdscaping in the Midwest

Author: Mariette Nowak, Peter Raven
Publisher:
ISBN: 0299291545
Pages: 336
Year: 2012
Go beyond bird feeders! Learn how to create outstanding bird habitats in your own yard with native plants that offer food, cover, and nesting sites for birds. This guide is packed with color photographs, sage advice, detailed instructions, and garden plans. It features nine different habitat gardens for hummingbirds, bluebirds, wintering birds, migrant birds, and birds that frequent prairies, wetlands, lakes, shrublands, and woodlands, along with advice about maintaining your plantings and augmenting them with nest boxes, birdbaths, misters, and perches. The information on recommended plant species includes their native ranges in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Ohio, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, and Wisconsin; the birds they attract; their visual characteristics; and their cultivation. Mariette Nowak also describes how gardeners featured in this book have gone beyond their own garden gates to work for the protection and restoration of bird habitat in their neighborhoods and communities. Birdscaping in the Midwest provides many sources of further information, including publications, websites, organizations, and native plant nurseries.
Birds of Minnesota and Wisconsin

Birds of Minnesota and Wisconsin

Author: Robert B. Janssen, Daryl D. Tessen, Gregory Kennedy
Publisher: Lone Pine Pub
ISBN: 1551053241
Pages: 376
Year: 2003
Learn about 322 of the most abundant or notable bird species found in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Each account features full-color illustrations, a range map and information on habitat, nesting, feeding, voice, best sites for viewing and similar species. A Q
Birds of North America

Birds of North America

Author: Kenn Kaufman
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0618132198
Pages: 383
Year: 2001-03-18
Collects photographs, range maps, and descriptive entries identifying the markings, habits, habitat, and voice of each species.
The Art of Migration

The Art of Migration

Author: John Bates, James H. Boone
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022604629X
Pages: 202
Year: 2013-07
Tiny ruby-throated hummingbirds weighing less than a nickel fly from the upper Midwest to Costa Rica every fall, crossing the six-hundred-mile Gulf of Mexico without a single stop. One of the many creatures that commute on the Mississippi Flyway as part of an annual migration, they pass along Chicago’s lakefront and through midwestern backyards on a path used by their species for millennia. This magnificent migrational dance takes place every year in Chicagoland, yet it is often missed by the region’s two-legged residents. The Art of Migration uncovers these extraordinary patterns that play out over the seasons. Readers are introduced to over two hundred of the birds and insects that traverse regions from the edge of Lake Superior to Lake Michigan and to the rivers that flow into the Mississippi. As the only artist in residence at the Field Museum, Peggy Macnamara has a unique vantage point for studying these patterns and capturing their distinctive traits. Her magnificent watercolor illustrations capture flocks, movement, and species-specific details. The illustrations are accompanied by text from museum staff and include details such as natural histories, notable features for identification, behavior, and how species have adapted to environmental changes. The book follows a gentle seasonal sequence and includes chapters on studying migration, artist’s notes on illustrating wildlife, and tips on the best ways to watch for birds and insects in the Chicago area. A perfect balance of science and art, The Art of Migration will prompt us to marvel anew at the remarkable spectacle going on around us.