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Hitler

Hitler

Author: Joachim Fest
Publisher: HMH
ISBN: 054419554X
Pages: 856
Year: 2013-02-01
“The best single volume available on the torturous life and savage reign of Adolf Hitler.” —Time A bestseller in its original German edition and subsequently translated into more than a dozen languages, Joachim Fest’s Hitler has become a classic portrait of a man, a nation, and an era. Fest tells and interprets the extraordinary story of a man’s and nation’s rise from impotence to absolute power, as Germany and Hitler, from shared premises, entered into their covenant. He shows Hitler exploiting the resentments of the shaken, post–World War I social order and seeing through all that was hollow behind the appearance of power, at home and abroad. Fest reveals the singularly penetrating politician, hypnotizing Germans and outsiders alike with the scope of his projects and the theatricality of their presentation. Perhaps most importantly, he also brilliantly uncovers the destructive personality that aimed for and achieved devastation on an unprecedented scale. As history and biography, this is a towering achievement, a compelling story told in a way only a German could tell it: “dispassionately, but from the inside” (Time).
Hitler

Hitler

Author: Joachim C. Fest
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt P
ISBN:
Pages: 844
Year: 1974

Hitler

Hitler

Author: Ian Kershaw
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 972
Year: 1998

Hitler, 1889-1936

Hitler, 1889-1936

Author: Ian Kershaw
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393320359
Pages: 845
Year: 2000
Traces Hitler's rise from a shelter for needy children in Austria to dictatorship over Germany and the beginning of his persecution of the Jews.
Hitler

Hitler

Author: Hans Diebow, Kurt Goeltzer
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 160
Year: 1931

Hitler and America

Hitler and America

Author: Klaus P. Fischer
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812204417
Pages: 368
Year: 2011-05-26
In February 1942, barely two months after he had declared war on the United States, Adolf Hitler praised America's great industrial achievements and admitted that Germany would need some time to catch up. The Americans, he said, had shown the way in developing the most efficient methods of production—especially in iron and coal, which formed the basis of modern industrial civilization. He also touted America's superiority in the field of transportation, particularly the automobile. He loved automobiles and saw in Henry Ford a great hero of the industrial age. Hitler's personal train was even code-named "Amerika." In Hitler and America, historian Klaus P. Fischer seeks to understand more deeply how Hitler viewed America, the nation that was central to Germany's defeat. He reveals Hitler's split-minded image of America: America and Amerika. Hitler would loudly call the United States a feeble country while at the same time referring to it as an industrial colossus worthy of imitation. Or he would belittle America in the vilest terms while at the same time looking at the latest photos from the United States, watching American films, and amusing himself with Mickey Mouse cartoons. America was a place that Hitler admired—for the can-do spirit of the American people, which he attributed to their Nordic blood—and envied—for its enormous territorial size, abundant resources, and political power. Amerika, however, was to Hitler a mongrel nation, grown too rich too soon and governed by a capitalist elite with strong ties to the Jews. Across the Atlantic, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt had his own, far more realistically grounded views of Hitler. Fischer contrasts these with the misconceptions and misunderstandings that caused Hitler, in the end, to see only Amerika, not America, and led to his defeat.
Hitler - New Research

Hitler - New Research

Author: Elizabeth Harvey, Johannes Hürter
Publisher: De Gruyter Oldenbourg
ISBN: 3110555603
Pages: 244
Year: 2018-08-21
How should we understand Hitler as a factor in the history of the Third Reich? In recent years scholarly interest in the German dictator has once again intensified, as is evident from debates surrounding the publication of Mein Kampf, and from the publication of numerous new studies on Hitler’s personality, ideology and politics. Edited by Elizabeth Harvey (University of Nottingham) and Johannes Hürter (Institute for Contemporary History Munich – Berlin), the third volume of the German Yearbook of Contemporary History presents the latest in German research on Hitler based on selected articles from the Vierteljahrshefte für Zeitgeschichte. Additionally, it includes new commentaries by renowned experts from the English-speaking world on theories concerning Hitler’s personality and authenticity, the sources of his radical racism, and the relationship between the dictator and German society.
Hitler

Hitler

Author: Joseph Peter Stern
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520029526
Pages: 254
Year: 1975
Seeks to pinpoint the source of Hitler's appeal to German society during the nineteen thirties through an examination of his speeches, writings and conversations
Hitler

Hitler

Author: Joachim C. Fest
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 1190
Year: 1973

Hitler's Berlin

Hitler's Berlin

Author: Thomas Friedrich
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300184883
Pages: 480
Year: 2012-07-12
From his first visit to Berlin in 1916, Hitler was preoccupied and fascinated by Germany's great capital city. In this vivid and entirely new account of Hitler's relationship with Berlin, Thomas Friedrich explores how Hitler identified with the city, how his political aspirations were reflected in architectural aspirations for the capital, and how Berlin surprisingly influenced the development of Hitler's political ideas. A leading expert on the twentieth-century history of Berlin, Friedrich employs new and little-known German sources to track Hitler's attitudes and plans for the city. Even while he despised both the cosmopolitan culture of the Weimar Republic and the profound Jewish influence on the city, Hitler was drawn to the grandiosity of its architecture and its imperial spirit. He dreamed of transforming Berlin into a capital that would reflect his autocracy, and he used the city for such varied purposes as testing his anti-Semitic policies and demonstrating the might of the Third Reich. Illuminating Berlin's burdened years under Nazi subjection, Friedrich offers new understandings of Hitler and his politics, architectural views, and artistic opinions.
Hitler

Hitler

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 1190
Year: 1973

The "Hitler Myth"

The "Hitler Myth"

Author: Ian Kershaw
Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks
ISBN: 0192802062
Pages: 299
Year: 2001
'Review from previous edition 'a book which should be read by everyone interested in the history of 20th-century Europe... perhaps the most revealing study available of popular opinion in Nazi Germany' ' -Times Higher Education Supplement
Hitler - Films from Germany

Hitler - Films from Germany

Author: K. Machtans, M. Ruehl
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137032383
Pages: 300
Year: 2012-11-30
The first book-length study to critically examine the recent wave of Hitler biopics in German cinema and television. A group of international experts discuss films like Downfall in the context of earlier portrayals of Hitler and draw out their implications for the changing place of the Third Reich in the national historical imagination.
Hitler

Hitler

Author: Volker Ullrich
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0385354398
Pages: 1008
Year: 2016-09-06
A New York Times 2016 Notable Book A major new biography—an extraordinary, penetrating study of the man who has become the personification of evil. “Ullrich reveals Hitler to have been an eminently practical politician—and frighteningly so. Timely… One of the best works on Hitler and the origins of the Third Reich to appear in recent years.” —Kirkus Reviews “An outstanding study… All the huge, and terrible moments of the early Nazi era are dissected…but the real strength of this book is in disentangling the personal story of man and monster.” —The Guardian (U.K.) For all the literature about Adolf Hitler there have been just four seminal biographies; this is the fifth, a landmark work that sheds important new light on Hitler himself. Drawing on previously unseen papers and a wealth of recent scholarly research, Volker Ullrich reveals the man behind the public persona, from Hitler's childhood to his failures as a young man in Vienna to his experiences during the First World War to his rise as a far-right party leader. Ullrich deftly captures Hitler's intelligence, instinctive grasp of politics, and gift for oratory as well as his megalomania, deep insecurity, and repulsive worldview. Many previous biographies have focused on the larger social conditions that explain the rise of the Third Reich. Ullrich gives us a comprehensive portrait of a postwar Germany humiliated by defeat, wracked by political crisis, and starved by an economic depression, but his real gift is to show vividly how Hitler used his ruthlessness and political talent to shape the Nazi party and lead it to power. For decades the world has tried to grasp how Hitler was possible. By focusing on the man at the center of it all, on how he experienced his world, formed his political beliefs, and wielded power, this riveting biography brings us closer than ever to the answer. Translated from the German by Jefferson Chase.
Manstein

Manstein

Author: Mungo Melvin
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1429967498
Pages: 656
Year: 2011-06-07
Among students of military history, the genius of Field Marshal Erich von Manstein (1887–1973) is respected perhaps more than that of any other World War II soldier. He displayed his strategic brilliance in such campaigns as the invasion of Poland, the Blitzkrieg of France, the sieges of Sevastopol, Leningrad, and Stalingrad, and the battles of Kharkov and Kursk. Manstein also stands as one of the war's most enigmatic and controversial figures. To some, he was a leading proponent of the Nazi regime and a symbol of the moral corruption of the Wehrmacht. Yet he also disobeyed Hitler, who dismissed his leading Field Marshal over this incident, and has been suspected by some of conspiring against the Führer. Sentenced to eighteen years by a British war tribunal at Hamburg in 1949, Manstein was released in 1953 and went on to advise the West German government in founding its new army within NATO. Military historian and strategist Mungo Melvin combines his research in German military archives and battlefield records with unprecedented access to family archives to get to the truth of Manstein's life and deliver this definitive biography of the man and his career.