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About Face

About Face

Author: Lindsay Eufusia, Elena Bellina, Paola Ugolini
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443815888
Pages: 285
Year: 2009-10-02
How do we represent ouselves and the cultures we live in? Is it possible to trace any boundaries between reality and self-representation? Because the self represented is the product of a process of selection and choice, in many ways to represent the self is, often simultaneously, to create the self and negate the self. What, then, becomes of the self once it is represented? Because the process of self-representation cumulates in a tangible result and given that any representation of the self is necessarily a construct which aims to render visible or knowable in concrete form the unseen and unknown, self-representation is vulnerable to assessments of its naturalness or artificiality, its honesty or deceit. Many issues affect the author or artist’s self-representation, both as process and form: the medium through which the self will be represented, the motivation for representing oneself, and the role of the audience, to name only a few relevant factors. This book explores the multifaceted nature of self-representation in relation to culture from the Middle Ages through the Renaissance up to contemporary Italian, American and Australian culture with reference to concepts and questions connected to literature, poetry, philosophy, theology, history, ethnicity studies, gender studies, and visual arts.
Medieval Italy

Medieval Italy

Author: Katherine L. Jansen, Joanna Drell, Frances Andrews
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812206061
Pages: 624
Year: 2011-09-21
Medieval Italy gathers together an unparalleled selection of newly translated primary sources from the central and later Middle Ages, a period during which Italy was famous for its diverse cultural landscape of urban towers and fortified castles, the spirituality of Saints Francis and Clare, and the vernacular poetry of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio. The texts highlight the continuities with the medieval Latin West while simultaneously emphasizing the ways in which Italy was exceptional, particularly for its cities that drove Mediterranean trade, its new communal forms of government, the impact of the papacy's temporal claims on the central peninsula, and the richly textured religious life of the mainland and its islands. A unique feature of this volume is its incorporation of the southern part of the peninsula and Sicily—the glittering Norman court at Palermo, the multicultural emporium of the south, and the kingdoms of Frederick II—into a larger narrative of Italian history. Including Hebrew, Arabic, Greek, and Lombard sources, the documents speak in ethnically and religiously differentiated voices, while providing wider chronological and geographical coverage than previously available. Rich in interdisciplinary texts and organized to enable the reader to focus by specific region, topic, or period, this is a volume that will be an essential resource for anyone with a professional or private interest in the history, religion, literature, politics, and built environment of Italy from ca. 1000 to 1400.
Expositions on Dante's Comedy

Expositions on Dante's Comedy

Author: Giovanni Boccaccio, Michael Papio
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 0802099750
Pages: 764
Year: 2009
In the fall of 1373, the city of Florence commissioned Giovanni Boccaccio to give lectures on Dante for the general population. These lectures, undeniably the most learned of all the early commentaries, came to be known as the Expositions on Dante's Divine Comedy. Though interrupted at Inferno XVII, they provide profound, near-contemporary interpretations of Dante's poem and contain, in many ways, some of the most beautiful aspects of Boccaccio's admirable literary production: narrative vignettes worthy of the best pages of the Decameron, insights on the rapidly changing approach to literary commentary, and a heartfelt belief that poetry is the most faithful guardian of history, philosophy, and theology. Michael Papio's excellent translation finally makes the entirety of Boccaccio's often overlooked masterpiece accessible to a wider public and supplies a wealth of information in the introduction and notes that will prove useful to specialists and general readers alike.
Petrarch & Dante

Petrarch & Dante

Author: Zygmunt G. Barański, Theodore J. Cachey
Publisher:
ISBN: 0268022119
Pages: 414
Year: 2009
Since the beginnings of Italian vernacular literature, the nature of the relationship between Francesco Petrarch (1304-1374) and his predecessor Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) has remained an open and endlessly fascinating question of both literary and cultural history. In this volume nine leading scholars of Italian medieval literature and culture address this question involving the two foundational figures of Italian literature. Through their collective reexamination of the question of who and what came between Petrarch and Dante in ideological, historiographical, and rhetorical terms, the authors explore the emergence of an anti-Dantean polemic in Petrarch's work. That stance has largely escaped scrutiny, thanks to a critical tradition that tends to minimize any suggestion of rivalry or incompatibility between them. The authors examine Petrarch's contentious and dismissive attitude toward the literary authority of his illustrious predecessor; the dramatic shift in theological and philosophical context that occurs from Dante to Petrarch; and their respective contributions as initiators of modern literary traditions in the vernacular. Petrarch's substantive ideological dissent from Dante clearly emerges, a dissent that casts in high relief the poets' radically divergent views of the relation between the human and the divine and of humans' capacity to bridge that gap. "An absolute A-list of contributors here considers all that falls, all forms of regard and disregard, between two of the great poets and cultural legislators of the western world. Timely, original, and highly recommended." --David Wallace, Judith Rodin Professor, University of Pennsylvania "A collection of sparkling essays exploring Petrarch's efforts to conceal his enormous debt to Dante while seeking to replace Dante's authority with his own. I found it hard to stop reading." --Ronald Witt, Duke University "Petrarch and Dante is a magnificent volume of uniformly superb essays. Instead of surveying Petrarch's variety or his influence upon later culture, the authors have ingeniously focused on shifting relationships with the poet's most formidable Italian predecessor, Dante; in so doing, they have produced scholarship that teases out the issues with great subtlety and nuance." --William J. Kennedy, Cornell University
Comedy in Chaucer and Boccaccio

Comedy in Chaucer and Boccaccio

Author: Carol Falvo Heffernan
Publisher: D. S. Brewer
ISBN: 1843842017
Pages: 151
Year: 2009
This book examines the relationship of the comic tales, the so-called fabliaux, in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Boccaccio's Decameron. It suggests that not only did Chaucer and Boccaccio share the same comic literary tradition stretching back into antiquity, but that Chaucer drew on the Italian's work; by putting the tales and the characters side-by-side, it throws new light on Chaucer's inventiveness.
Francis of Assisi

Francis of Assisi

Author: Andre Vauchez
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300184921
Pages: 320
Year: 2012-10-23
In this towering work, André Vauchez draws on the vast body of scholarship on Francis of Assisi, emphasizing in particular the important research of the last 30 years. He creates a complete and engaging portrait of the saint, then explores how the memory of Francis was shaped by contemporaries who recollected him in their writings. Vauchez completes the book by setting "Poverello" in the context of his time, bringing to light what was new, surprising, and even astonishing in the life and vision of this man. The first part of the book is a fascinating reconstruction of Francis's life and work. The second and third parts deal with the myriad texts—hagiographies, chronicles, sermons, personal testimonies, etc.—of writers who recorded aspects of Francis's life and movement as they remembered them, and used those remembrances to construct a portrait of Francis relevant to their concerns. In the final part of the book, Vauchez explores those aspects of Francis's life, personality, and spiritual vision that were unique to him, including his experience of God, his approach to nature, his understanding and use of Scripture, and his impact on culture as well as culture's impact on him.
Parlar Cantando

Parlar Cantando

Author: Elena Abramov-van Rijk
Publisher: Peter Lang
ISBN: 3039116703
Pages: 395
Year: 2009
This book is a pioneering attempt to explore the fascinating and hardly known realm of reciting poetry in medieval and Renaissance Italy. The study of more than 50 treatises on both music and poetry, as well as other literary sources and documents from the period between 1300 and 1600, highlights above all the practice of "parlar cantando" (-speaking through singing- - the term found in "De li contrasti, " a fourteenth-century treatise on poetry) as rooted in the art of reciting verses. Situating the practice of" parlar cantando "in the context of late medieval poetic delivery, the author sheds new light on the origin and history of late Renaissance opera style, which their inventors called "stile recitativo, rappresentativo" or, exactly, "parlar cantando." The deepest roots of the Italian tradition of "parlar cantando" are thus revealed, and the cultural background of the birth of opera is reinterpreted and revisited from the much broader perspective of what appears to be the most important Italian mode of music making between the age of Dante and Petrarch and the beginning of Italian opera around 1600."
Letters on Familiar Matters (Rerum Familiarium Libri), Vol. 1

Letters on Familiar Matters (Rerum Familiarium Libri), Vol. 1

Author: Francesco Petrarch
Publisher:
ISBN: 1599100002
Pages: 472
Year: 2009-08-25
THIS TRANSLATION makes available for the first time to English-speaking readers Petrarch's earliest and perhaps most important collection of prose letters. They were written for the most part between 1325 and 1366, and were organized into the present collection of twenty-four books between 1345 and 1366. THE COLLECTION represents a portrait of the artist as a young man seen through the eyes of the mature artist. Whether in the writing of poetry, or being crowned poet laureate, or in confessing his faults, describing the dissolution of the kingdom of Naples, summoning up the grandeur of ancient Rome, or in writing to pope or emperor, Petrarch was always the consummate artist, deeply concerned with creating a desired effect by means of a dignified gracefulness, and always conscious that his private life and thoughts could be the object of high art and public interest. AS EARLY AS 1436 Leonardo Bruni wrote in his Life of Petrarch: "Petrarch was the first man to have had a sufficiently fine mind to recognize the gracefulness of the lost ancient style and to bring it back to life." It was indeed the very style or manner in which Petrarch consciously sought to create the impression of continuity with the past that was responsible for the enormous impact he made on subsequent generations. THIS COMPLETE TRANSLATION by Aldo S. Bernardo has long been out of print and is reproduced here in its entirety in three volumes. Vol. 1, Books I-VIII. 472 pp. Introduction, notes, bibliography.
The Victorians and Italy

The Victorians and Italy

Author: Alessandro Vescovi, Luisa Villa, Paul Vita
Publisher: Polimetrica s.a.s.
ISBN: 8876991638
Pages: 362
Year: 2009

Singing Poetry in Renaissance Florence

Singing Poetry in Renaissance Florence

Author: Blake McDowell Wilson
Publisher:
ISBN: 882225810X
Pages: 291
Year: 2009

Italian Renaissance Studies

Italian Renaissance Studies

Author: E. F. Jacob
Publisher:
ISBN: 0571069304
Pages: 507
Year: 1960