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Peggy

Peggy

Author: Jacqueline Bograd Weld
Publisher: Dutton Adult
ISBN:
Pages: 493
Year: 1986
A biography of the patroness and collector of art who assembled the foremost collection of modern art in Italy.
Mistress of Modernism

Mistress of Modernism

Author: Mary V. Dearborn
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0618128069
Pages: 382
Year: 2004
A detailed new biography of the legendary art collector and culture maven offers insight into the childhood, self-education in the ways of art and artists, and sexual appetites of Peggy Guggenheim, in a portrait of a woman who transformed the art world of the twentieth century.
Peggy Guggenheim

Peggy Guggenheim

Author: Anton Gill
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
ISBN: 0006531350
Pages: 506
Year: 2001
"Peggy Guggenheim's tempestuous life (1898-1979) spanned the most exciting and volatile years of the twentieth century, and she lived it to the full. How she became one of the foremost collectors of modern art - and one of the century's most formidable lovers - is the subject of this biography. 'Mrs Guggenheim, how many husbands have you had?', she was once asked. 'Do you mean my own, or other people's?'" "Meticulously researched, filled with colourful incident and a distinguished cast-list, Anton Gill's biography reveals the inner drives of a remarkable woman and indefatigable patron."--BOOK JACKET.
Peggy Guggenheim

Peggy Guggenheim

Author: Laurence Tacou-Rumney
Publisher: Rizzoli International Publications
ISBN: 0847824616
Pages: 175
Year: 2002
One of the most fascinating women of the twentieth century, Peggy Guggenheim was one of the art world's most influential and flamboyant patrons. Effortlessly combining her personal and professional lives (indeed, they were almost indistinguishable), her life was marked by drama and adventure. Every aspect of that extraordinary life is reproduced in Peggy Guggenheim: A Collector's Album, beginning with her privileged childhood as a member of the wealthy and powerful Guggenheim family and ending with her settling in her Venetian palazzo on the Grand Canal. One of the most fascinating women of the twentieth century, Peggy Guggenheim was one of the art world's most influential and flamboyant patrons. Effortlessly combining her personal and professional lives (indeed, they were almost indistinguishable), her life was marked by drama and adventure. Every aspect of that extraordinary life is reproduced in Peggy Guggenheim: A Collector's Album, beginning with her privileged childhood as a member of the wealthy and powerful Guggenheim family and ending with her settling in her Venetian palazzo on the Grand Canal.
Peggy Guggenheim

Peggy Guggenheim

Author: Francine Prose
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300216521
Pages: 240
Year: 2015-09-29
One of twentieth-century America’s most influential patrons of the arts, Peggy Guggenheim (1898–1979) brought to wide public attention the work of such modern masters as Jackson Pollock and Man Ray. In her time, there was no stronger advocate for the groundbreaking and the avant-garde. Her midtown gallery was the acknowledged center of the postwar New York art scene, and her museum on the Grand Canal in Venice remains one of the world’s great collections of modern art. Yet as renowned as she was for the art and artists she so tirelessly championed, Guggenheim was equally famous for her unconventional personal life, and for her ironic, playful desire to shock. Acclaimed best-selling author Francine Prose offers a singular reading of Guggenheim’s life that will enthrall enthusiasts of twentieth-century art, as well as anyone interested in American and European culture and the interrelationships between them. The lively and insightful narrative follows Guggenheim through virtually every aspect of her extraordinary life, from her unique collecting habits and paradigm-changing discoveries, to her celebrity friendships, failed marriages, and scandalous affairs, and Prose delivers a colorful portrait of a defiantly uncompromising woman who maintained a powerful upper hand in a male-dominated world. Prose also explores the ways in which Guggenheim’s image was filtered through the lens of insidious antisemitism.
The Unfinished Palazzo: Life, Love and Art in Venice: The Stories of Luisa Casati, Doris Castlerosse and Peggy Guggenheim

The Unfinished Palazzo: Life, Love and Art in Venice: The Stories of Luisa Casati, Doris Castlerosse and Peggy Guggenheim

Author: Judith Mackrell
Publisher: Thames & Hudson
ISBN: 0500773963
Pages: 408
Year: 2017-09-05
The story of Venice’s “Unfinished Palazzo”— told through the lives of three of its most unconventional, passionate, and fascinating residents: Luisa Casati, Doris Castlerosse, and Peggy Guggenheim Commissioned in 1750, the Palazzo Venier was planned as a testimony to the power and wealth of a great Venetian family, but the fortunes of the Veniers waned midconstruction and the project was abandoned. Empty, unfinished, and decaying, the building was considered an eyesore until the early twentieth century when it attracted and inspired three women at key moments in their lives: Luisa Casati, Doris Castlerosse, and Peggy Guggenheim. Luisa Casati turned her home into an aesthete’s fantasy where she hosted parties as extravagant and decadent as Renaissance court operas, spending small fortunes on her own costumes in her quest to become a “living work of art” and muse. Doris Castlerosse strove to make her mark in London and Venice during the glamorous, hedonistic interwar years, hosting film stars and royalty at glittering parties. In the postwar years, Peggy Gugenheim turned the Palazzo into a model of modernist simplicity that served as a home for her exquisite collection of modern art that today draws tourists and art lovers from around the world. Each vivid life story is accompanied by previously unseen materials from family archives, weaving an intricate history of these legendary art world eccentrics.
New York Magazine

New York Magazine

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 136
Year: 1986-03-31
New York magazine was born in 1968 after a run as an insert of the New York Herald Tribune and quickly made a place for itself as the trusted resource for readers across the country. With award-winning writing and photography covering everything from politics and food to theater and fashion, the magazine's consistent mission has been to reflect back to its audience the energy and excitement of the city itself, while celebrating New York as both a place and an idea.
Memories of the Revolution

Memories of the Revolution

Author: Jill Dolan
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472068636
Pages: 242
Year: 2015-11-30
Scripts, interviews, photos, and critical commentary documenting the riotous beginnings of this long-lived experimental theater space for women
Confessions Of an Art Addict

Confessions Of an Art Addict

Author: Peggy Guggenheim
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062288369
Pages: 100
Year: 2013-04-16
A patron of art since the 1930s, Peggy Guggenheim, in a candid self-portrait, provides an insider's view of the early days of modern art, with revealing accounts of her eccentric wealthy family, her personal and professional relationships, and often surprising portrayals of the artists themselves. Here is a book that captures a valuable chapter in the history of modern art, as well as the spirit of one of its greatest advocates.
Mary McGrory

Mary McGrory

Author: John Norris
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0525429719
Pages: 342
Year: 2015
Before there was Maureen Dowd or Gail Collins or Molly Ivins, there was Mary McGrory. She was a trailblazing columnist who achieved national syndication and reported from the front lines of American politics for five decades. From her first assignment reporting on the Army - McCarthy hearings to her Pulitzer-winning coverage of Watergate and controversial observations of President Bush after September 11, McGrory humanized the players on the great national stage while establishing herself as a uniquely influential voice. Behind the scenes she flirted, drank, cajoled, and jousted with the most important figures in American life, breaking all the rules in the journalism textbook. Her writing was admired and feared by such notables as Lyndon Johnson (who also tried to seduce her) and her friend Bobby Kennedy who observed, 'Mary is so gentle - until she gets behind a typewriter.' Her soirees, filled with Supreme Court justices, senators, interns, and copy boys alike, were legendary. As the red-hot center of the Beltway in a time when the newsrooms were dominated by men, McGrory makes for a powerfully engrossing subject. Laced with juicy gossip and McGrory's own acerbic wit, John Norris's colorful biography reads like an insider's view of latter-day American history - and one of its most enduring characters. 'Mary McGrory- The First Queen of Journalismwill scratch every nostalgic itch with ink-stained fingers. McGrory's five-decade career covering Washington provides an enormous picture window onto the media landscape, and Norris . . . focuses much of his attention on the glamour of the era . . . You may find yourself beguiled by McGrory as well. I realized I was under her spell at the end of the book.' New York Times Book Review'Any person of spirit, who loves good writing, will almost feel, after reading this book, that he or she did have a chance to dance the rumba toward dawn with Mary McGrory.' Roy Blount Jr.'Mary McGrory's life as a Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington columnist is so interesting that it's hard to understand why there hasn't been a book about her until now. Enter Norris . . . with this balanced, page-turning biography . . . Ted Kennedy proclaimed McGrory 'poet laureate of American journalism,' and this nuanced portrait provides plenty of evidence.' Kirkus(starred review)'Norris portrays a talented and complex woman . . . Those interested in recent political history will relish the fascinating insider details.' Library Journal'A dame, a babe, a wit, a raconteur, McGrory was the ultimate journalist- interested, interesting, discerning, dedicated. Her curiosity and charm, intelligence and integrity were nonpareil and earned her coveted insider access to the most important events and people of the last half of the twentieth century. She laid the groundwork for generations of journalists of both genders for decades to come. Few biographies are page-turners, but Norris's vivid account of this pioneering writer so vibrantly recalls the heady heyday of op-ed journalism that readers will avidly mourn the advent of the 24/7 cable and talk radio punditry that took its place. McGrory was an icon of wit and wisdom; we will not see her like again.' Booklist(starred review)'Sensitive and engrossing . . . this book is a rich portrait, and will likely encourage readers to seek more of McGrory's groundbreaking writing.' Publishers Weekly'Norris . . . earns his reader's respect with careful attention to detail and a precarious but precise balance between his primary, individual subject and the context of U.S. and world history.Mary McGroryis a striking story, meticulously and entertainingly portrayed.' Shelf Awareness'Intimate, gossipy, and laced with delicious anec
You Must Change Your Life: The Story of Rainer Maria Rilke and Auguste Rodin

You Must Change Your Life: The Story of Rainer Maria Rilke and Auguste Rodin

Author: Rachel Corbett
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393245063
Pages: 336
Year: 2016-09-06
Winner of the 2016 Marfield Prize In 1902, Rainer Maria Rilke—then a struggling poet in Germany—went to Paris to research and write a short book about the sculptor Auguste Rodin. The two were almost polar opposites: Rilke in his twenties, delicate and unknown; Rodin in his sixties, carnal and revered. Yet they fell into an instantaneous friendship. Transporting readers to early twentieth-century Paris, Rachel Corbett’s You Must Change Your Life is a vibrant portrait of Rilke and Rodin and their circle, revealing how deeply Rodin’s ideas about art and creativity influenced Rilke’s classic Letters to a Young Poet.
Out of This Century

Out of This Century

Author: Peggy Guggenheim
Publisher:
ISBN: 0233005528
Pages: 416
Year: 2018-06
This is the fascinating autobiography of a society heiress who became the bohemian doyenne of the art world. Written in her own words it is the frank and outspoken story of her life and loves: her stormy relationships with such men as Max Ernst and Jackson Pollock, and her discovery of new artists. Known as 'the mistress of modern art', Peggy Guggenheim was a passionate collector and major patron. She amassed one of the most important collections of early twentieth century European and American art embracing cubism, surrealism and expressionism. A must read for anyone with an interest in these major-league artists, this seminal period of art history, and the ultimate self-invented woman.
Peggy Guggenheim

Peggy Guggenheim

Author: Francine Prose
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300216521
Pages: 240
Year: 2015-09-29
One of twentieth-century America’s most influential patrons of the arts, Peggy Guggenheim (1898–1979) brought to wide public attention the work of such modern masters as Jackson Pollock and Man Ray. In her time, there was no stronger advocate for the groundbreaking and the avant-garde. Her midtown gallery was the acknowledged center of the postwar New York art scene, and her museum on the Grand Canal in Venice remains one of the world’s great collections of modern art. Yet as renowned as she was for the art and artists she so tirelessly championed, Guggenheim was equally famous for her unconventional personal life, and for her ironic, playful desire to shock. Acclaimed best-selling author Francine Prose offers a singular reading of Guggenheim’s life that will enthrall enthusiasts of twentieth-century art, as well as anyone interested in American and European culture and the interrelationships between them. The lively and insightful narrative follows Guggenheim through virtually every aspect of her extraordinary life, from her unique collecting habits and paradigm-changing discoveries, to her celebrity friendships, failed marriages, and scandalous affairs, and Prose delivers a colorful portrait of a defiantly uncompromising woman who maintained a powerful upper hand in a male-dominated world. Prose also explores the ways in which Guggenheim’s image was filtered through the lens of insidious antisemitism.
Surprised by Oxford

Surprised by Oxford

Author: Carolyn Weber
Publisher: Thomas Nelson
ISBN: 0849949319
Pages: 480
Year: 2013-02-04
"Well written, often poignant and surprisingly relatable." - Kirkus Reviews "A hugely readable journey of cultural and spiritual discovery, sparkling with wit and wisdom." - Alister McGrath "Carolyn Weber's memoir reads like a fast-paced novel. I loved the humor, skillful use of language and her compelling account of her steps to finding God at Oxford. I was totally captivated from beginning to end." - Marilyn Meberg Surprised by Oxford is the memoir of a skeptical agnostic who comes to a dynamic personal faith in God during graduate studies in literature at Oxford University. Carolyn Weber arrives at Oxford a feminist from a loving but broken family, suspicious of men and intellectually hostile to all things religious. As she grapples with her God-shaped void alongside the friends, classmates, and professors she meets, she tackles big questions in search of Truth, love, and a life that matters. From issues of fatherhood, feminism, doubt, doctrine, and love, Weber explores the intricacies of coming to faith with an aching honesty and insight echoing that of the poets and writers she studied. Rich with illustration and literary references, Surprised by Oxford is at once gritty and lyrical; both humorous and spiritually perceptive. This savvy, credible account of Christian conversion and its after-effects follows the calendar year and events of the school year as it entertains, informs, and promises to engage even the most skeptical and unlikely reader. "Surprised by Oxford is a sprightly contribution to the genre of spiritual memoirs in the vein of C.S. Lewis's Surprised by Joy and Lauren F. Winner's Girl Meets God. Carolyn Weber is an unconventional thinker whose engagingly told faith journey will speak to folks who still believe that thoughtful people cannot be Christian." - Lyle W. Dorsett
Late Modernism

Late Modernism

Author: Tyrus Miller
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520921992
Pages: 280
Year: 1999-02-25
Tyrus Miller breaks new ground in this study of early twentieth-century literary and artistic culture. Whereas modernism studies have generally concentrated on the vital early phases of the modernist revolt, Miller focuses on the turbulent later years of the 1920s and 1930s, tracking the dissolution of modernism in the interwar years. In the post-World War I reconstruction and the worldwide crisis that followed, Miller argues, new technological media and the social forces of mass politics opened fault lines in individual and collective experience, undermining the cultural bases of the modernist movement. He shows how late modernists attempted to discover ways of occupying this new and often dangerous cultural space. In doing so they laid bare the ruin of the modernist aesthetic at the same time as they transcended its limits. In his wide-ranging theoretical and historical discussion, Miller relates developments in literary culture to tendencies in the visual arts, cultural and political criticism, mass culture, and social history. He excavates Wyndham Lewis's hidden borrowings from Al Jolson's The Jazz Singer; situates Djuna Barnes between the imagery of haute couture and the intellectualism of Duchamp; uncovers Beckett's affinities with Giacometti's surrealist sculptures and the Bolshevik clowns Bim-Bom; and considers Mina Loy as both visionary writer and designer of decorative lampshades. Miller's lively and engaging readings of culture in this turbulent period reveal its surprising anticipation of our own postmodernity.