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The New Republic

The New Republic

Author: William Hurrell Mallock
Publisher: London : Chatto and Windus 1877.
ISBN:
Pages: 368
Year: 1878

The New Republic

The New Republic

Author: Lionel Shriver
Publisher: HarperCollins Australia
ISBN: 1743095260
Pages: 384
Year: 2012-04-01
From the acclaimed author of the National Book Award finalist SO MUCH FOR THAT comes a part parable, part adventure story about a group of foreign correspondents reporting from a nonexistent peninsula of Portugal in the mid-1990s. Edgar Kellogg , a disgruntled New York lawyer who has always yearned to be popular, is more than ready to leave his lucrative career for the excitement and uncertainty of journalism. When he's offered the post of foreign correspondent in a Portuguese backwater that has sprouted a homegrown terrorist movement, Edgar recognises the disappeared larger-than-life reporter he's been sent to replace, Barrington Saddler, as exactly the outsize, well-loved character he longs to emulate. Yet all is not as it appears. 'the Daring Soldiers of Barba' (the SOB) have been blowing up the rest of the world for years in order to win independence for a province so dismal, backward, and windblown that you couldn't give the rat hole away. So why, with Barrington vanished, do terrorist incidents claimed by the SOB suddenly dry up? A droll, playful novel, the New Republic addresses weighty issues like terrorism with the deft, tongue-in-cheek touch that is vintage Shriver. It also presses the more intimate question: What makes particular people so magnetic, while the rest of us inspire a shrug? What's their secret? And in the end, who has the better life-the admired, or the admirer?
A New Republic of the Heart

A New Republic of the Heart

Author: Terry Patten
Publisher: North Atlantic Books
ISBN: 1623170478
Pages: 352
Year: 2018
"Terry Patten asserts that we are living at the center of a multidimensional and radical revolution. Recasting current problems as emergent opportunities, he points out humans' natural tendency to evolve during periods of acute crisis and offers creative responses, practices, and conscious conversations for tackling the profound inner and outer work we must do to build an integral future. In this book for seekers and change agents, Terry Patten makes the case that the mounting challenges of our current global crises are being met with an emergent, interconnected revolution that integrates both inner personal growth work with outer awareness, activism, and service. Rather than diagnosing everything that is wrong with our current society, Patten identifies how spiritual and political awakenings are intertwined. He also looks at the range of responses to the crisis--from techno-optimism to ecological activism to survivalism--appreciating the partial truths in them all. Patten explores creative responses, practices, and conscious conversations that, together, will be taking us into an integral and inspiring future. This is a practical book for activists seeking to reframe, reanimate, and reintegrate their work for change"--
Affairs of Honor

Affairs of Honor

Author: Joanne B. Freeman
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300097557
Pages: 376
Year: 2002
Offering a reassessment of the tumultuous culture of politics on the national stage during America's early years, when Jefferson, Burr, and Hamilton were among the national leaders, Freeman shows how the rituals and rhetoric of honor provides ground rules for political combat. Illustrations.
Battles of the New Republic

Battles of the New Republic

Author: Prashant Jha
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1849044597
Pages: 288
Year: 2014
This lively account of Nepal's recent history conveys the complexities of life in its better-known Himalayan regions as well as in the Terai, or foothills.
Kehinde Wiley

Kehinde Wiley

Author: Eugenie Tsai
Publisher: Prestel Verlag
ISBN: 3641174805
Pages: 192
Year: 2015-02-18
Filled with reproductions of Kehinde Wiley’s bold, colorful, and monumental work, this book encompasses the artist’s various series of paintings as well as his sculptural work—which boldly explore ideas about race, power, and tradition.
Insurrections of the Mind

Insurrections of the Mind

Author: Franklin Foer
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062340387
Pages: 608
Year: 2014-09-16
To commemorate the 100th anniversary of The New Republic, an extraordinary anthology of essays culled from the archives of the acclaimed and influential magazine. Founded by Herbert Croly and Walter Lippmann in 1914 to give voice to the growing progressive movement, The New Republic has charted and shaped the state of American liberalism, publishing many of the twentieth century’s most important thinkers. Insurrections of the Mind is an intellectual biography of this great American political tradition. In seventy essays, organized chronologically by decade, a stunning collection of writers explore the pivotal issues of modern America. Weighing in on the New Deal; America’s role in war; the rise and fall of communism; religion, race, and civil rights; the economy, terrorism, technology; and the women’s movement and gay rights, the essays in this outstanding volume speak to The New Republic’s breathtaking ambition and reach. Introducing each article, editor Franklin Foer provides colorful biographical sketches and amusing anecdotes from the magazine’s history. Bold and brilliant, Insurrections of the Mind is a celebration of a cultural, political, and intellectual institution that has stood the test of time. Contributors include: Virginia Woolf, Vladimir Nabokov, George Orwell, Graham Greene, Philip Roth, Pauline Kael, Michael Lewis, Zadie Smith, William Faulkner, Ralph Ellison, James Wolcott, D. H. Lawrence, John Maynard Keynes, Langston Hughes, John Updike, and Margaret Talbot.
A Kind of Mirraculas Paradise

A Kind of Mirraculas Paradise

Author: Sandra Allen
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501134051
Pages: 288
Year: 2018-01-23
Dazzlingly, daringly written, marrying the thoughtful originality of Maggie Nelson's The Argonauts with the revelatory power of Neurotribes and The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, this propulsive, stunning book illuminates the experience of living with schizophrenia like never before. Sandra Allen did not know her uncle Bob very well. As a child, she had been told he was “crazy,” that he had spent time in mental hospitals while growing up in Berkeley in the 60s and 70s. But Bob had lived a hermetic life in a remote part of California for longer than she had been alive, and what little she knew of him came from rare family reunions or odd, infrequent phone calls. Then in 2009 Bob mailed her his autobiography. Typewritten in all caps, a stream of error-riddled sentences over sixty, single-spaced pages, the often incomprehensible manuscript proclaimed to be a “true story” about being “labeled a psychotic paranoid schizophrenic,” and arrived with a plea to help him get his story out to the world. In A Kind of Mirraculas Paradise, Allen translates her uncle’s autobiography, artfully creating a gripping coming-of-age story while sticking faithfully to the facts as he shared them. Lacing Bob’s narrative with chapters providing greater contextualization, Allen also shares background information about her family, the culturally explosive time and place of her uncle’s formative years, and the vitally important questions surrounding schizophrenia and mental healthcare in America more broadly. The result is a heartbreaking and sometimes hilarious portrait of a young man striving for stability in his life as well as his mind, and an utterly unique lens into an experience that, to most people, remains unimaginable.
Severance

Severance

Author: Ling Ma
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 0374717117
Pages: 304
Year: 2018-08-14
Maybe it’s the end of the world, but not for Candace Chen, a millennial, first-generation American and office drone meandering her way into adulthood in Ling Ma’s offbeat, wryly funny, apocalyptic satire, Severance. Candace Chen, a millennial drone self-sequestered in a Manhattan office tower, is devoted to routine. With the recent passing of her Chinese immigrant parents, she’s had her fill of uncertainty. She’s content just to carry on: She goes to work, troubleshoots the teen-targeted Gemstone Bible, watches movies in a Greenpoint basement with her boyfriend. So Candace barely notices when a plague of biblical proportions sweeps New York. Then Shen Fever spreads. Families flee. Companies cease operations. The subways screech to a halt. Her bosses enlist her as part of a dwindling skeleton crew with a big end-date payoff. Soon entirely alone, still unfevered, she photographs the eerie, abandoned city as the anonymous blogger NY Ghost. Candace won’t be able to make it on her own forever, though. Enter a group of survivors, led by the power-hungry IT tech Bob. They’re traveling to a place called the Facility, where, Bob promises, they will have everything they need to start society anew. But Candace is carrying a secret she knows Bob will exploit. Should she escape from her rescuers? A send-up and takedown of the rituals, routines, and missed opportunities of contemporary life, Ling Ma’s Severance is a moving family story, a quirky coming-of-adulthood tale, and a hilarious, deadpan satire. Most important, it’s a heartfelt tribute to the connections that drive us to do more than survive.
Hearing Secret Harmonies

Hearing Secret Harmonies

Author: Anthony Powell
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0749306467
Pages: 271
Year: 1991-01

Cherokee Renascence in the New Republic

Cherokee Renascence in the New Republic

Author: William Gerald McLoughlin
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 069100627X
Pages: 472
Year: 1992
The Cherokees, the most important tribe in the formative years of the American Republic, became the test case for the Founding Fathers' determination to Christianize and "civilize" all Indians and to incorporate them into the republic as full citizens. From the standpoint of the Cherokees, rather than from that of the white policymakers, William McLoughlin tells the dramatic success story of the "renascence" of the tribe. He goes on to give a full account of how the Cherokees eventually fell before the expansionism of white America and the zeal of Andrew Jackson. "This is more than a chronicle of events in Cherokee history during this decisive period, although the material covered here has not been better treated before. McLoughlin includes not only the tribe's relations with the federal government but also the internal divisions that seemed likely to split the nation on several occasions."--Gary E. Moulton, American Historical Review "A masterfully crafted, meticulously documented analysis of Cherokee acculturation between 1794 and 1833."--Mary Young, Journal of the Early Republic
Eloquent Rage

Eloquent Rage

Author: Brittney Cooper
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1250112893
Pages: 288
Year: 2018-02-20
NAMED A BEST/MOST ANTICIPATED BOOK OF 2018 BY: Glamour • Chicago Reader • Bustle • Autostraddle With searing honesty, intimacy and humor too, America’s leading young black feminist celebrates the power of rage. Melissa Harris Perry says: “I was waiting for an author who wouldn’t forget, ignore, or erase us black girls as they told their own story...I was waiting and she has come—in Brittney Cooper.” Michael Eric Dyson says: “Cooper may be the boldest young feminist writing today. Her critique is sharp, her love of Black people and Black culture is deep, and she will make you laugh out loud.” Rebecca Traister says: "Brittney Cooper is a national treasure." Mychal Denzel Smith says: "Brittney Cooper is the Black Feminist Prophet we urgently need." So what if it’s true that Black women are mad as hell? They have the right to be. In the Black feminist tradition of Audre Lorde, Brittney Cooper reminds us that anger is a powerful source of energy that can give us the strength to keep on fighting. Far too often, Black women’s anger has been caricatured into an ugly and destructive force that threatens the civility and social fabric of American democracy. But Cooper shows us that there is more to the story than that. Black women’s eloquent rage is what makes Serena Williams such a powerful tennis player. It’s what makes Beyoncé’s girl power anthems resonate so hard. It’s what makes Michelle Obama an icon. Eloquent rage keeps us all honest and accountable. It reminds women that they don’t have to settle for less. When Cooper learned of her grandmother's eloquent rage about love, sex, and marriage in an epic and hilarious front-porch confrontation, her life was changed. And it took another intervention, this time staged by one of her homegirls, to turn Brittney into the fierce feminist she is today. In Brittney Cooper’s world, neither mean girls nor fuckboys ever win. But homegirls emerge as heroes. This book argues that ultimately feminism, friendship, and faith in one's own superpowers are all we really need to turn things right side up again.
The Dawning of American Labor

The Dawning of American Labor

Author: Brian Greenberg
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119065682
Pages: 232
Year: 2017-11-29
A concise history of labor and work in America from the birth of the Republic to the Industrial Age and beyond From the days of Thomas Jefferson, Americans believed that they could sustain a capitalist industrial economy without the class conflict or negative socioeconomic consequences experienced in Europe. This dream came crashing down in 1877 when the Great Strike, one of the most militant labor disputes in US history, convulsed the nation’s railroads. In The Dawning of American Labor a leading scholar of American labor history draws upon first-hand accounts and the latest scholarship to offer a fascinating look at how Americans perceived and adapted to the shift from a largely agrarian economy to one dominated by manufacturing. For the generations following the Great Strike, “the Labor Problem” and the idea of class relations became a critical issue facing the nation. As Professor Greenberg makes clear in this lively, highly accessible historical exploration, the 1877 strike forever cast a shadow across one of the most deeply rooted articles of national faith—the belief in American exceptionalism. What conditions produced the faith in a classless society? What went wrong? These questions lie at the heart of The Dawning of American Labor. Provides a concise, comprehensive, and completely up-to-date synthesis of the latest scholarship on the early development of industrialization in the United States Considers how working people reacted, both in the workplace and in their communities, as the nation’s economy made its shift from an agrarian to an industrial base Includes a formal Bibliographical Essay—a handy tool for student research Works as a stand-alone text or an ideal supplement to core curricula in US History, US Labor, and 19th-Century America Accessible introductory text for students in American history classes and beyond, The Dawning of American Labor is an excellent introduction to the history of labor in the United States for students and general readers of history alike.
A New Republic of Letters

A New Republic of Letters

Author: Jerome McGann
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674369246
Pages: 253
Year: 2014-03-17
Jerome McGann's manifesto argues that the history of texts and how they are preserved and accessed for interpretation are the overriding subjects of humanist study in the digital age. Theory and philosophy no longer suffice as an intellectual framework. But philology--out of fashion for decades--models these concerns with surprising fidelity.
Bite the Hand That Feeds You

Bite the Hand That Feeds You

Author: Henry Fairlie
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300155522
Pages: 368
Year: 2009-06-23
Henry Fairlie was one of the most colorful and trenchant journalists of the twentieth century. The British-born writer made his name on Fleet Street, where he coined the term “The Establishment,” sparred in print with the likes of Kenneth Tynan, and caroused with Kingsley Amis, among many others. In America his writing found a home in the pages of the New Yorker and other top magazines and newspapers. When he died, he was remembered as “quite simply the best political journalist, writing in English, in the last fifty years.” Remarkable for their prescience and relevance, Fairlie’s essays celebrate Winston Churchill, old-fashioned bathtubs, and American empire; they ridicule Republicans who think they are conservatives and yuppies who want to live forever. Fairlie is caustic, controversial, and unwavering—especially when attacking his employers. With an introduction by Jeremy McCarter, Bite the Hand That Feeds You restores a compelling voice that, among its many virtues, helps Americans appreciate their country anew.