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The Secret State

The Secret State

Author: Peter Hennessy
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141979208
Pages: 528
Year: 2014-03-27
This updated edition of The Secret State revises Hennessy's picture of the Soviet threat that was presented to ministers from the last days of the Second World War to the 1960s. He maps the size and shape of the Cold War state built in response to that perceived threat, and traces the arguments successive generations of ministers, the military and civil servants have used to justify the British nuclear capability. He also adds new material exploring the threats presented by the IRA and radical Islamic terrorists post 9/11. In what circumstances would the Prime Minister authorize the use of nuclear force and how would his orders be carried out? What would the Queen be told and when? In this captivating new account, Peter Hennessy provides the best answers we have yet had to these questions.
The Secret State

The Secret State

Author: Peter Hennessy
Publisher: Penguin Global
ISBN:
Pages: 286
Year: 2003
As Cold War Britain came under the terrifying shadow of nuclear destruction, secret government plans were underway to ensure the survival of a chosen few . . . Peter Hennessy's sensational book draws on recently declassified intelligence and war-planning documents, and interviews with key officials to reveal a chilling behind-the-scenes picture of the corridors of power when the world teetered on the brink of disaster. Who would have gone underground with the Prime Minister in the event of an attack? Where is this secret bunker? Under what circumstances would we retaliate? Where were the Soviet's UK targets thought to be? Whose finger was - and is - on the button? And what kind of world would have been left when the dust had settled and 'breakdown' had occurred . . .'
The Silent Deep

The Silent Deep

Author: James Jinks, Peter Hennessy
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141973706
Pages: 832
Year: 2015-10-29
'The Ministry of Defence does not comment upon submarine operations' is the standard response of officialdom to enquiries about the most secretive and mysterious of Britain's armed forces, the Royal Navy Submarine Service. Written with unprecedented co-operation from the Service itself and privileged access to documents and personnel, The Silent Deep is the first authoritative history of the Submarine Service from the end of the Second World War to the present. It gives the most complete account yet published of the development of Britain's submarine fleet, its capabilities, its weapons, its infrastructure, its operations and above all - from the testimony of many submariners and the first-hand witness of the authors - what life is like on board for the denizens of the silent deep. Dramatic episodes are revealed for the first time: how HMS Warspite gathered intelligence against the Soviet Navy's latest ballistic-missile-carrying submarine in the late 1960s; how HMS Sovereign made what is probably the longest-ever trail of a Soviet (or Russian) submarine in 1978; how HMS Trafalgar followed an exceptionally quiet Soviet 'Victor III', probably commanded by a Captain known as 'the Prince of Darkness', in 1986. It also includes the first full account of submarine activities during the Falklands War. But it was not all victories: confrontations with Soviet submarines led to collisions, and the extent of losses to UK and NATO submarine technology from Cold War spy scandals are also made more plain here than ever before. In 1990 the Cold War ended - but not for the Submarine Service. Since June 1969, it has been the last line of national defence, with the awesome responsibility of carrying Britain's nuclear deterrent. The story from Polaris to Trident - and now 'Successor' - is a central theme of the book. In the year that it is published, Russian submarines have once again been detected off the UK's shores. As Britain comes to decide whether to renew its submarine-carried nuclear deterrent, The Silent Deep provides an essential historical perspective.
Having it So Good

Having it So Good

Author: Peter Hennessy
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141929316
Pages: 768
Year: 2007-05-03
Having It So Good evokes Britain emerging from the shadow of war and the privations of austerity and rationing into growing affluence. Peter Hennessy takes his readers into the front-rooms where the Coronation was watched on television, to the classrooms and now coffee bars of 1950s Britain – and also into the secret Cabinet rooms in which decisions about the British nuclear bomb were taken and plans made for the catastrophe of nuclear war. He brings to life the ageing Churchill, in his last faltering spell as Prime Minister, the highly-strung Anthony Eden taking his country to war in the teeth of American opposition and world opinion, and the rise of ‘Supermac’ Harold Macmillan, gliding over problems with his Edwardian insouciance. Above all, Having It So Good captures the smell and the flavour of an extraordinary decade in which affluence and anxiety combined to produce their own winds of change.
Postwar

Postwar

Author: Tony Judt
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1440624763
Pages: 960
Year: 2006-09-05
Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize Winner of the Council on Foreign Relations Arthur Ross Book Award One of the New York Times' Ten Best Books of the Year Almost a decade in the making, this much-anticipated grand history of postwar Europe from one of the world's most esteemed historians and intellectuals is a singular achievement. Postwar is the first modern history that covers all of Europe, both east and west, drawing on research in six languages to sweep readers through thirty-four nations and sixty years of political and cultural change-all in one integrated, enthralling narrative. Both intellectually ambitious and compelling to read, thrilling in its scope and delightful in its small details, Postwar is a rare joy.
Cabinets and the Bomb

Cabinets and the Bomb

Author: Peter Hennessy
Publisher: OUP/British Academy
ISBN: 0197264220
Pages: 368
Year: 2007-11-01
The nuclear weapons question runs through recent British history like an irradiated thread. This collection of declassified papers uncovers the private debates and justifications for Britain being a nuclear power, exchanged between ministers, civil servants, scientists and intelligence officers. The narrative takes the story up to spring 2007.
Cold War Secret Nuclear Bunkers

Cold War Secret Nuclear Bunkers

Author: Nick McCamley
Publisher: Pen and Sword
ISBN: 1844155080
Pages: 304
Year: 2013-05-31
"Nuclear Bunkers" tells the previously undisclosed story of the secret defence structures built by the West during the Cold War years. The book describes in fascinating detail a vast umbrella of radar stations that spanned the North American continent and the north Atlantic from the Aleutian islands through Canada to the North Yorkshire moors, all centred upon an enormous secret control centre buried hundreds of feet below Cheyenne Mountain in Colorado. This is complemented in the United Kingdom with a chain of secret radars codenamed 'Rotor' built in the early 1950's, and eight huge, inland sector control centres, built over 100' underground at enormous cost. The book reveals the various bunkers built for the U.S Administration, including the Raven Rock alternate war headquarters (the Pentagon's wartime hideout), the Greenbrier bunker for the Senate and House of Representatives, and the Mount Weather central government headquarters amongst others. Developments in Canada, including the Ottawa 'Diefenbunker' and the regional government bunkers are also studied. In the UK there were the London bunkers and the Regional War rooms built in the 1950's to protect against the Soviet threat, and their replacement in 1958 by much more hardened, underground Regional Seats of Government in the provinces, and the unique Central Government War Headquarters at Corsham. Also included in the UK coverage is the UK Warning and Monitoring Organisation with its underground bunkers and observation posts, as well as the little known bunkers built by the various local authorities and by the public utilities. Finally the book examines the provision, (or more accurately, lack of provision), of shelter space for the general population, comparing the situation in the USA and the UK with some other European countries and with the Soviet Union.
The Prime Minister: The Office and Its Holders Since 1945

The Prime Minister: The Office and Its Holders Since 1945

Author: Peter Hennessy
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 0312293135
Pages: 685
Year: 2001-10-05
The author analyzes the office of prime minister in England in the postwar period, profiling the eleven office-holders and discussing changes in the office.
My Target Was Leningrad

My Target Was Leningrad

Author: Philip Goodall
Publisher: Fonthill Media
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 2017-01-20

Beneath the City Streets

Beneath the City Streets

Author: Peter Laurie
Publisher:
ISBN: 0140033815
Pages: 301
Year: 1972

Britain and the Cold War, 1945-1991

Britain and the Cold War, 1945-1991

Author: Sean Greenwood
Publisher: MacMillan
ISBN:
Pages: 227
Year: 2000
During the Cold War, the process of East West tension, though dominated by the Superpowers, was often conditioned, and in its early stages accelerated, by Britain's continuing world wide interests and influence. Since the 1980s, British scholars have been using newly released material to demonstrate the central role in the origins and development of the Cold War played by British governments from Attlee to Wilson and beyond. This is a survey of this work, which offers its own interpretations of the major events from the start of the Cold War to its end with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.
Operation Paperclip

Operation Paperclip

Author: Annie Jacobsen
Publisher: Little, Brown
ISBN: 0316221058
Pages: 592
Year: 2014-02-11
The explosive story of America's secret post-WWII science programs, from the author of the New York Times bestseller Area 51 In the chaos following World War II, the U.S. government faced many difficult decisions, including what to do with the Third Reich's scientific minds. These were the brains behind the Nazis' once-indomitable war machine. So began Operation Paperclip, a decades-long, covert project to bring Hitler's scientists and their families to the United States. Many of these men were accused of war crimes, and others had stood trial at Nuremberg; one was convicted of mass murder and slavery. They were also directly responsible for major advances in rocketry, medical treatments, and the U.S. space program. Was Operation Paperclip a moral outrage, or did it help America win the Cold War? Drawing on exclusive interviews with dozens of Paperclip family members, colleagues, and interrogators, and with access to German archival documents (including previously unseen papers made available by direct descendants of the Third Reich's ranking members), files obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, and dossiers discovered in government archives and at Harvard University, Annie Jacobsen follows more than a dozen German scientists through their postwar lives and into a startling, complex, nefarious, and jealously guarded government secret of the twentieth century. In this definitive, controversial look at one of America's most strategic, and disturbing, government programs, Jacobsen shows just how dark government can get in the name of national security.
Muddling Through

Muddling Through

Author: Peter Hennessy
Publisher: Victor Gollancz
ISBN: 0575063661
Pages: 317
Year: 1996

Britain on the Brink

Britain on the Brink

Author: Jim Wilson
Publisher: Pen and Sword
ISBN: 1783378425
Pages: 208
Year: 2012-12-19
At the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis, Britain was America's first-line defence, a vulnerable, but unsinkable 'aircraft carrier' on which the United States based elements of their nuclear deterrent. But the British public was unaware that, as tensions rose thousands of miles away, the UK itself was under imminent threat of armageddon.
Armageddon and Paranoia

Armageddon and Paranoia

Author: Rodric Braithwaite
Publisher: Profile Books
ISBN: 1782832912
Pages:
Year: 2017-09-21
In 1945, the atom bomb was dropped on Hiroshima and warfare was never the same again. Armageddon and Paranoia relates how the power of the atom was harnessed to produce weapons capable of destroying human civilisation and considers what this has done to the world. There are few villains in this story: on both sides of the Iron Curtain, dedicated scientists cracked the secrets of nature, dutiful military men planned out possible manoeuvres and politicians wrestled with potentially intolerable decisions. Patriotic citizens acquiesced to the idea that their country needed the ultimate means of defence. Some tried to grapple with the unanswerable question: what end could possibly be served by such fearsome means? Those who protested went unheard. None of them wanted to start a nuclear war, but all of them were paranoid about what the other side might do. The danger of annihilation by accident or misjudgement has not been entirely absent since. Rodric Braithwaite, author of bestsellers Moscow 1941 and Afgantsy, paints a vivid and detailed portrait of this intense period in history. Its implications are terrifyingly relevant today, as ignorant and thoughtless talk about nuclear war begins to spread once more.