Women At The Front Hospital Workers In Civil War America Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Women at the Front

Women at the Front

Author: Jane E. Schultz
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807864153
Pages: 376
Year: 2005-12-15
As many as 20,000 women worked in Union and Confederate hospitals during America's bloodiest war. Black and white, and from various social classes, these women served as nurses, administrators, matrons, seamstresses, cooks, laundresses, and custodial workers. Jane E. Schultz provides the first full history of these female relief workers, showing how the domestic and military arenas merged in Civil War America, blurring the line between homefront and battlefront. Schultz uses government records, private manuscripts, and published sources by and about women hospital workers, some of whom are familiar--such as Dorothea Dix, Clara Barton, Louisa May Alcott, and Sojourner Truth--but most of whom are not well-known. Examining the lives and legacies of these women, Schultz considers who they were, how they became involved in wartime hospital work, how they adjusted to it, and how they challenged it. She demonstrates that class, race, and gender roles linked female workers with soldiers, both black and white, but became sites of conflict between the women and doctors and even among themselves. Schultz also explores the women's postwar lives--their professional and domestic choices, their pursuit of pensions, and their memorials to the war in published narratives. Surprisingly few parlayed their war experience into postwar medical work, and their extremely varied postwar experiences, Schultz argues, defy any simple narrative of pre-professionalism, triumphalism, or conciliation.
Women at the Front

Women at the Front

Author: Jane E. Schultz
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 080782867X
Pages: 360
Year: 2004
Reexamines the lives and legacies of the twenty thousand women who worked in Union and Confederate hospitals during the Civil War, using government records and private manuscripts to discover who they were and to explore their postwar lives.
Women at the Front

Women at the Front

Author: Jane E. Schultz
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807858196
Pages: 360
Year: 2007-02-01
Although Angelina and Sarah Grimke have been regarded as equally gifted and involved abolitionists and nineteenth-century women's rights advocates, this first biography of Angelina clearly shows that she, indeed, was the outstanding leader, as her contemporaries recognized. Through the use of unpublished documentary sources and impressive psychological insights, Lumpkin provides new perspectives on Angelina, her husband Theodore Weld, and her sister Sarah. Originally published 1974. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.
Worth a Dozen Men

Worth a Dozen Men

Author: Libra Rose Hilde
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 0813932122
Pages: 317
Year: 2012
In antebellum society, women were regarded as ideal nurses because of their sympathetic natures. However, they were expected to exercise their talents only in the home; nursing strange men in hospitals was considered inappropriate, if not indecent. Nevertheless, in defiance of tradition, Confederate women set up hospitals early in the Civil War and organized volunteers to care for the increasing number of sick and wounded soldiers. As a fledgling government engaged in a long and bloody war, the Confederacy relied on this female labor, which prompted a new understanding of women’s place in public life and a shift in gender roles. Challenging the assumption that Southern women’s contributions to the war effort were less systematic and organized than those of Union women, Worth a Dozen Men looks at the Civil War as a watershed moment for Southern women. Female nurses in the South played a critical role in raising army and civilian morale and reducing mortality rates, thus allowing the South to continue fighting. They embodied a new model of heroic energy and nationalism, and came to be seen as the female equivalent of soldiers. Moreover, nursing provided them with a foundation for pro-Confederate political activity, both during and after the war, when gender roles and race relations underwent dramatic changes. Worth a Dozen Men chronicles the Southern wartime nursing experience, tracking the course of the conflict from the initial burst of Confederate nationalism to the shock and sorrow of losing the war. Through newspapers and official records, as well as letters, diaries, and memoirs—not only those of the remarkable and dedicated women who participated, but also of the doctors with whom they served, their soldier patients, and the patients’ families—a comprehensive picture of what it was like to be a nurse in the South during the Civil War emerges.
This Birth Place of Souls

This Birth Place of Souls

Author: Harriet Eaton
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019539268X
Pages: 338
Year: 2011
After the battle of Antietam in 1862, Harriet Eaton traveled to Virginia from her home in Portland, Maine, to care for soldiers in the Army of the Potomac. Portland's Free Street Baptist Church, with liberal ties to abolition, established the Maine Camp Hospital Association and made the widowed Eaton its relief agent in the field. One of many Christians who believed that patriotic activism could redeem the nation, Eaton quickly learned that war was no respecter of religious principles. Doing the work of nurse and provisioner, Eaton tended wounded men and those with smallpox and diphtheria during two tours of duty. She preferred the first tour, which ended after the battle of Chancellorsville in 1863, to the second, more sedentary, assignment at City Point, Virginia, in 1864. There the impositions of federal bureaucracy standardized patient care at the expense of more direct communication with soldiers. Eaton deplored the arrogance of U.S. Sanitary Commissioners whom she believed saw state benevolent groups as competitors for supplies. Eaton struggled with the disruptions of transience, scarcely sleeping in the same place twice, but found the politics of daily toil even more challenging. Conflict between Eaton and co-worker Isabella Fogg erupted almost immediately over issues of propriety; the souring working conditions leading to Fogg's ouster from Maine state relief efforts by late 1863. Though Eaton praised some of the surgeons with whom she worked, she labeled others charlatans whose neglect had deadly implications for the rank and file. If she saw villainy, she also saw opportunities to convert soldiers and developed an intense spiritual connection with a private, which appears to have led to a postwar liaison. Published here for the first time, the uncensored nursing diary is a rarity among medical accounts of the war, showing Eaton to be an astute observer of human nature and not as straight-laced as we might have thought. This hardcover edition includes an extensive introduction from the editor, transcriptions of relevant letters and newspaper articles, and a thoroughly researched biographical dictionary of the people mentioned in the diary.
Civil War Nurse

Civil War Nurse

Author: Hannah Anderson Ropes
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 0870497901
Pages: 149
Year: 1993
The chief nurse of the Union Hospital in Washington, D.C., describes life and stress in the hospital and comments on notable persons of power. An amazing look at the Civil War.
Women Doctors and Nurses of the Civil War

Women Doctors and Nurses of the Civil War

Author: Lesli J. Favor
Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group
ISBN: 0823944522
Pages: 112
Year: 2004-01-01
Profiles American women who served as doctors and nurses in the Civil War, including Clara Barton, Mary Ann Bickerdyke, Dorothea Dix, Dr. Esther Hill Hawks, and Dr. Mary Edwards Walker.
Patriotic Toil

Patriotic Toil

Author: Jeanie Attie
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801422248
Pages: 294
Year: 1998
During the Civil War, the United States Sanitary Commission attempted to replace female charity networks and traditions of voluntarism with a centralized organization that would ensure women's support for the war effort served an elite, liberal vision of nationhood. Coming after years of debate over women's place in the democracy and status as citizens, soldier relief work offered women an occasion to demonstrate their patriotism and their rights to inclusion in the body politic. Exploring the economic and ideological conflicts that surrounded women's unpaid labors on behalf of the Union army, Jeanie Attie reveals the impact of the Civil War on the gender structure of nineteenth-century America. She illuminates how the war became a testing ground for the gendering of political rights and the ideological separation of men's and women's domains of work and influence. Attie draws on letters by hundreds of women in which they reflect on their political awakenings at the war's outbreak and their increasing skepticism of national policies as the conflict dragged on. Her book integrates the Civil War into the history of American gender relations and the development of feminism, providing a nuanced analysis of the relationship among gender construction, class development, and state formation in nineteenth-century America.
Our Army Nurses

Our Army Nurses

Author: Mary Gardner Holland
Publisher: Bakhsh Press
ISBN: 1445574160
Pages: 550
Year: 2010-04
Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
Civil War Sisterhood

Civil War Sisterhood

Author: Judith Ann Giesberg
Publisher: UPNE
ISBN: 1555536581
Pages: 256
Year: 2006-07-01
A study that challenges established scholarship on the history of women's public activism.
Women in the Civil War

Women in the Civil War

Author: Mary Elizabeth Massey
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803282133
Pages: 371
Year: 1966
Given by the Madeley Estate.
Hospital Days

Hospital Days

Author: Jane Stuart Woolsey
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 180
Year: 1868

Woman of Valor

Woman of Valor

Author: Stephen B. Oates
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439105367
Pages: 527
Year: 1995-05-01
When the Civil War broke out, Clara Barton wanted more than anything to be a Union soldier, an impossible dream for a thirty-nine-year-old woman, who stood a slender five feet tall. Determined to serve, she became a veritable soldier, a nurse, and a one-woman relief agency operating in the heart of the conflict. Now, award-winning author Stephen B. Oates, drawing on archival materials not used by her previous biographers, has written the first complete account of Clara Barton's active engagement in the Civil War. By the summer of 1862, with no institutional affiliation or official government appointment, but impelled by a sense of duty and a need to heal, she made her way to the front lines and the heat of battle. Oates tells the dramatic story of this woman who gave the world a new definition of courage, supplying medical relief to the wounded at some of the most famous battles of the war -- including Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Battery Wagner, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and Petersburg. Under fire with only her will as a shield, she worked while ankle deep in gore, in hellish makeshift battlefield hospitals -- a bullet-riddled farmhouse, a crumbling mansion, a windblown tent. Committed to healing soldiers' spirits as well as their bodies, she served not only as nurse and relief worker, but as surrogate mother, sister, wife, or sweetheart to thousands of sick, wounded, and dying men. Her contribution to the Union was incalculable and unique. It also became the defining event in Barton's life, giving her the opportunity as a woman to reach out for a new role and to define a new profession. Nursing, regarded as a menial service before the war, became a trained, paid occupation after the conflict. Although Barton went on to become the founder and first president of the Red Cross, the accomplishment for which she is best known, A Woman of Valor convinces us that her experience on the killing fields of the Civil War was her most extraordinary achievement.
Civil War Nurse Narratives, 1863-1870

Civil War Nurse Narratives, 1863-1870

Author: Daneen Wardrop
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1609383672
Pages: 277
Year: 2015-10-01
Civil War Nurse Narratives, 1863–1870, examines the first wave of autobiographical narratives written by northern female nurses and published during the war and shortly thereafter, ranging from the well-known Louisa May Alcott to lesser-known figures such as Elvira Powers and Julia Wheelock. From the hospitals of Washington, DC, and Philadelphia, to the field at Gettysburg in the aftermath of the battle, to the camps bordering front lines during active combat, these nurse narrators reported on what they saw and experienced for an American audience hungry for tales of individual experience in the war. As a subgenre of war literature, the Civil War nurse narrative offered realistic reportage of medical experiences and declined to engage with military strategies or Congressional politics. Instead, nurse narrators chronicled the details of attending wounded soldiers in the hospital, where a kind of microcosm of US democracy-in-progress emerged. As the war reshaped the social and political ideologies of the republic, nurses labored in a workplace that reflected cultural changes in ideas about gender, race, and class. Through interactions with surgeons and other officials they tested women’s rights convictions, and through interactions with formerly enslaved workers they wrestled with the need to live up to their own often abolitionist convictions and support social equality. By putting these accounts in conversation with each other, Civil War Nurse Narratives productively explores a developing genre of war literature that has rarely been given its due and that offers refreshing insights into women’s contributions to the war effort. Taken together, these stories offer an impressive and important addition to the literary history of the Civil War.
Civil War Pharmacy

Civil War Pharmacy

Author: Michael A Flannery
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 0809335921
Pages: 328
Year: 2017-05-24
"This book covers pharmacy during the American Civil War from four primary aspects: civilian pharmacy, including women's voluntary organizations; pharmacy in the Union; pharmacy in the Confederacy; and pharmacy on the battlefield and at sea. It gives a thorough overview of the professional, economic, and military factors comprising pharmacy from 1861 to 1865"--